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Recent Gas News/GasBuddy Blog

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Drunk Driver Gets 120 Days After Causing Death

Las Vegas Review Journal --
ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A 25-year-old Kansas City man gets two suspended sentences and 120 days in jail for a hit-and-run accident that killed a 57-year-old motorcyclist whose wife and daughter were killed by a drunken driver two years earlier.  (go to article)

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Hundreds protest US plans to export fracked gas

AljazeeraAmerica-Environment -- Hundreds of protesters marched Sunday in Washington, D.C., to show their opposition to a planned natural gas export terminal in Maryland that would ship gas fracked in the United States overseas to Asia.

The Stop Fracked Gas Exports rally, backed by more than 40 environmental groups, called on the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulations Committee (FERC) to halt final approval of a port they say will endanger local health and safety.

"This Cove Point terminal would drain huge pools of Marcellus Shale gas for export 6,000 miles to Asia. It would be the first such liquefied natural gas export facility ... ever, built right next to a residential neighborhood," the groups said in a press release. "Local residents are deeply concerned about an accident on the facility tha  (go to article)

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Seven small earthquakes rattle Oklahoma This is the latest swarm in a state where a recent upsurge

AljazeeraAmerica-Environment -- The U.S. Geological Survey has recorded seven small earthquakes shaking central Oklahoma in a span of just about 14 hours.

They ranged from magnitude 2.6 to 2.9 and were centered in the Guthrie, Jones and Langston areas, 15 miles to 30 miles northeast of Oklahoma City. The USGS said the quakes were recorded between 7:57 p.m. Saturday and 9:51 a.m. Sunday. No injuries or damage were reported.

Those follow four other quakes, including a 4.3-magnitude temblor near Langston recorded shortly after noon Saturday. The other Saturday morning quakes ranged in magnitude from 2.9 to 3.2.

Residents in central Oklahoma have said they want to know whether the surge in earthquake activity in the region is caused by oil and gas drilling operations in the area.  (go to article)

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U.S. gas prices drop 4 cents to $3.67 a gallon

Detroit News -- A survey says the average price of a gallon of regular gasoline in the U.S. has fallen 4 cents over the last three weeks to $3.67.

Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg said Sunday that crude oil prices fell over news that Libyan output has risen and Iraq’s production was not substantially harmed by recent violence.

The survey taken Friday shows the average price for a gallon of midgrade gas was $3.86 and the average price for a gallon of premium was $4.01. Diesel averaged $3.94 a gallon.

Michigan drivers are paying the average price of $3.64 a gallon, according to gasbuddy.com. In Detroit the average price was $3.72 a gallon.

Of cities surveyed in the continental U.S., Tulsa, Oklahoma, had the lowest average price at $3.35 a gallon. San Francisco had the highest average at $4.12 a gallon.
 (go to article)

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Hack a Tesla, win $10,000

Autoblog -- In the world of computers, competitions that challenge so-called "white hat" hackers are fairly common. Break into this system in X minutes and we'll give you Y dollars. Rarely, though, does this world cross over with the realm of automobiles.

At the 2014 SyScan Conference, which runs from July 16 to 17 in Beijing, hackers have the chance to win $10,000, provided they can break into the systems of a Tesla Model S.  (go to article)

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A Pipeline Threatens Our Family Land

NY Times -- LANCASTER, Pa. — MOUNTAIN LAUREL, tufted with pink blooms each spring, and leathery emerald rhododendron line the Tucquan Glen, a steep hollow in southern Lancaster County, Pa. The Tucquan Creek, home to towering tulip poplar and oak trees and the occasional red fox, rushes over natural rock dams and plunges into secluded swimming holes before it meets the Susquehanna River and continues to the Chesapeake Bay.

I know this creek, the way it tastes and sounds, because I grew up with it, playing in the ferns and wild columbine along its banks. My father moved to the hollow as a single parent in 1976. When he died 30 years later, my sister, Malinda Harnish Clatterbuck, decided to raise her two daughters in the home where we were raised.
This spring a man with a clipboard knocked on Malinda’s  (go to article)

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Power plants coming to electricity-hungry region

The Baltimore Sun -- Developers haven't built a new power plant of any significance in Maryland for over a decade — one reason the state imports more electricity than almost any other in the country, racking up extra charges for consumers.

But change is coming.
Two large projects, permits in hand, could begin construction this year. Two more seek approval. Land-clearing work is underway on a fifth, a small facility intended to run when demand is high.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bs-bz-maryland-power-plants-20140713,0,5562617.story#ixzz37P0Wj3uQ  (go to article)

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Flying motorcycle now on sale

FOX News -- The race to sell the first flying car of the 21st century may be won by a motorcycle.

The PAL-V is a transforming gyrocopter designed and built in the Netherlands that’s now on sale, with deliveries scheduled to begin in 2016, according to BBC Autos.

A modern take on the type of flying machine used by James Bond in the film “You Only Live Twice,” the PAL-V – for Personal Air and Land Vehicle – takes its usefulness to the next level.  (go to article)

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Industry lukewarm on emerging highway deal

The Hill -- ransportation advocates in Washington reacted to an emerging highway funding deal in Congress with trepidation, saying they were glad lawmakers were heading toward preventing an infrastructure bankruptcy but upset that they were settling for another short-term stopgap.

The House and Senate begin moving similar versions of legislation that would replenish the Department of Transportation’s dwindling Highway Trust Fund and extend federal infrastructure spending beyond the end of the year.

The movement came when Democrats agreed to drop demands that Republicans agree to a shorter transportation funding patch that would have expired after the midterm elections in exchange for an infusion of cash into the nearly broke Highway Trust Fund.
 (go to article)

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Ten states with the worst highway spending woes

The Fiscal Times -- Governors and state transportation officials nationwide are canceling or postponing critical highway, bridge and mass transit projects in the face of the imminent collapse of the federal Highway Trust Fund.  (go to article)

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Sheriff: Bus was hit by stolen car going wrong way

Associated Press -- A car that collided with a Greyhound bus on an Indiana highway, killing the car's driver and injuring 19 people on the bus, had just been stolen and was headed in the wrong direction, authorities said.

Phillip Lloyd, the driver of the stolen 1999 Ford Mustang, died at the scene of the Sunday morning collision on Interstate 70 near Richmond, Wayne County Sheriff Jeff Cappa said. Lloyd was from Richmond, which is about 70 miles east of Indianapolis and near the Ohio border.
 (go to article)

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Editorial: It’s time for Canada to increase highway speed limits

Maclean's -- B.C. is going to let drivers go 120 km/h on some highways. The rest of Canada needs to get up to speed.
 (go to article)

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Who is shaping the nation's railroad safety rules?

Saint Louis Post-Dispatch -- WASHINGTON • A string of fiery train derailments across the country has triggered a high-stakes but behind-the-scenes campaign to shape how the government responds to calls for tighter safety rules. Billions of dollars are riding on how these rules are written, and lobbyists from the railroads, tank car manufacturers and the oil, ethanol and chemical industries have met 13 times since March with officials at the White House and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Their universal message: Don't make us pay for increased safety because that's another industry's problem.

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Conservatives in Alberta rankled by the removal of ‘Wildrose Country’ slogan on new licence plates

National Post -- It has the feel of a heated family fight over a broken dinner plate, when mom knows dad is having an affair — a seemingly trivial set piece that reveals fault lines between conservative-conservatives and Progressive Conservatives; between old Albertans, and new

The old red-and-white licence plates have served AB for more than 30 yrs, simple and discreet, marked with one of the province’s informal mottoes: “Wild Rose Country

Government announced this week that it would spend $15M to roll out a revamped plate with a new reflective coating

3M designs the coating, threw in 3 free potential new designs, all fairly mediocre depictions of mountains

The old motto, espousing the essential Wild Rosiness of AB, is gone entirely replaced with an anodyne pointer to the government’s official website  (go to article)

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Toronto will feel like North Miami by 2100: climate change report

Ottawa Citizen -- The U.S.-based Climate Coalition projected average summer (Jun, Jul and Aug) high temperatures in major cities for the period of 2080 to 2100

Chicago will be more like TX, around 33.9C, Seattle like S CA, Omaha like S TX and Wichita will feel like S AZ

Some temperatures don’t have a city in the U.S. that compared. In Las Vegas summer highs average will be 44C, like now in Riyadh, Phoenix like Kuwait

In Toronto, high averages at 25.3 will feel like 31.6C. As Torontonians know, with humidity it feels 40C

Montreal will feel like Charleston, SC at 30.9C; Winnipeg like Decatur, AL at 31.1C; Calgary like Des Moines at 28.5C; and Vancouver like Laguna Niguel at 27.5C

Don’t start investing in Canadian palm trees just yet. could mean more extreme weather during the rest of the year as well  (go to article)

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Birmingham gas station offers classic gas prices for classic cars

THE DETROIT NEWS -- Vintage car owners lined up at the Birmingham Mobil gas station Friday morning for gas prices dating back to the 1950s and '60s. The offer, sponsored by Hagerty Insurance, was in celebration of National Collector Car Appreciation Day. Drivers paid whatever the price for gas was in the year their car was made.

Birmingham — What do you get when you combine classic cars with classic gas prices?

A traffic jam of classic proportions.

Cruisers lined up to gas up at a the Birmingham Mobil gas station at 36101 Woodward Riday morning for gas prices dating back to the 1950s and 60s.

The low-cost, high-octane offer was part of National Collector Car Appreciation Day sponsored by Hagerty Insurance, which specializes in insurance for classic and collectible cars, motorcycles and boats.  (go to article)

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Dormant Interstate 10 Questar pipeline may be revived

Desert News -- A 57-year-old pipeline lying dormant underground along the Interstate 10 corridor could again deliver oil to the California coast, if its corporate owner gains the approval of regulators.

In addition to restarting the line that's been unused for 16 years, Salt Lake City-based Questar Corp. is eyeing locations in the region to build a new rail terminal that would transfer oil from train to pipe.

The 16-inch steel pipe runs 96 miles from Long Beach to a point between Cabazon and Whitewater. It's capable of carrying up to 120,000 barrels of oil a day but has been unused since Questar purchased it in 1998.

If reactivated, the line would better link refineries in Long Beach to the growing supply of crude oil from the central United States and Canada in a way considered safer than railroad.  (go to article)

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Lyft stalls NYC launch amid legal squabbles

CNBC -- John Zimmer steps onto a New York City sidewalk and beelines straight for the fenced-in corner parking lot. "This is what we're trying change," he says, motioning to the rows of cars stacked atop hydraulic lifts. "Eighty percent of [car] seats are empty at all times, and it leads to an incredible loss of productivity due to traffic—$80 billion here in the U.S."  (go to article)

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Gulf dead zone should be smaller than 2013, tied to ethanol production

Fuel Fix -- The Gulf of Mexico dead zone — which scientists tie to fertilizer from Midwest agriculture including ethanol production — will be slightly smaller than last year’s but still about the size of Connecticut.

The dead zone occurs when nitrogen-based fertilizer washes from Corn Belt farms into the Mississippi River and winds its way south into the Gulf, providing nutrients for a bloom of algae. When the bloom dies, it leaves oxygen-depleted water where other marine life can’t survive.

An indirect link was established between the dead zone and U.S. ethanol production when, in 2012, the dead zone contracted dramatically after an extreme drought damaged corn crops.

The annual dead zone typically peaks in July and August, and this year’s could stretch from South Texas to Alabama and cover 4,  (go to article)

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Geothermal: The Other Alternative Energy

Motley Fool -- With a growing movement to adopt more sustainable energy solutions, investors may be interested in knowing that geothermal fields produce just one-sixth of the carbon dioxide that a clean natural-gas-fueled power plant produces, and this energy production is seen by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the most efficient, clean, and cost effective for temperature control. Considering the growing movement to become energy independent and lower carbon output, there is no better time to explore the benefits of geothermal power.

While I'm a huge fan of wind and solar applications, they are intermittent, and energy storage solutions are still a concern. This has me thinking there is room for geothermal to wiggle itself into the renewable conversation without the need to depend entirel  (go to article)

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Shell Is Failing To Account For Climate Risks, Finds Study

By Megan Darby -- Shell was accused of “Orwellian doublethink” in its attitude to climate change as an influential think-tank published new analysis on July 9, 2014.  (go to article)

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Democrat Congressman: Tax Drivers for Every Mile They Drive Read more at http://minutemennews.com/20

MinutemenNews.com -- While the House and the Senate this week issued measures intended to temporarily replenish the Highway Trust Fund before it runs out of money next month, Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) ended the week by proposing to hike – then abolish – the federal fuel tax and replace it with a per-mile “fee.”

“The policy development that I’m most excited about and that will reinforce the right practices for the future: After we raise the gas tax, we should abolish it,” Blumenauer said on Friday at the liberal Center for American Progress in Washington, D.C.  (go to article)

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What's Behind All the Car Recalls

Kiplinger.com -- f you think you've heard more news about recalls lately, you’re right. General Motors alone has recalled more than 13 million vehicles since January—including a highly publicized recall for faulty ignition switches that prevented airbags from deploying in a handful of models and led to 13 deaths. GM agreed to pay a $35 million civil penalty (the most possible) after a government investigation found that the automaker knew about the problem in 2009 and failed to report it. In March, Toyota agreed to pay a $1.2 billion penalty to settle a criminal probe by the Justice Department for failing to report defects that led to the unintended acceleration recalls of 2009 and 2010.  (go to article)

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Algenol - Bio-fuel and Chinese Hackers

Naples Daily News -- What makes a small company near San Carlos Park so interesting to cyberspies? Algae.

It’s not usually the stuff of trade secrets, but Algenol, a company with about 125 employees, is developing technology that converts algae biomass into transportation fuels, including biodiesel and gasoline - all while consuming the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide rather than producing it. Algenol’s work would interest anyone who wants to curb climate change. As the Chinese government tries to limit the hazardous pollution that has upset its citizens, it has set out to increase biofuel production tenfold.  (go to article)

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New York Won't Keep Oil Train Details Secret

Huffington Post -- ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York's homeland security agency is refusing requests from freight railroads to further restrict public information about their crude oil shipments, concluding it's not sensitive security information and will be given to local emergency planners.

Federal officials reached a similar conclusion in June, ordering railroads to give state officials details about oil-train routes and volumes so emergency responders can be better prepared for their duties.

Railroads sought to keep the information secret, arguing that information on oil train routes and volumes are security sensitive. The issue followed a string of fiery accidents. A derailment and explosion in Quebec last July killed 47 people.  (go to article)

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Former Health Secretary: 'Don't BS The Public' About Fracking

Huffington Post -- PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pennsylvania's former health secretary says the state has failed to seriously study the potential health impacts of one of the nation's biggest natural gas drilling booms.

Dr. Eli Avila also says the state's current strategy is a disservice to people and even to the industry itself because health officials need to be proactive in protecting the public.

"The lack of any action speaks volumes," said Avila, who is now the public health commissioner for Orange County, New York. "Don't BS the public. Their health comes first."

Avila told The Associated Press that he believes senior political advisers did a "disservice" to Republican Gov. Tom Corbett by putting a study of health effects on the back burner three years ago. That has led to a cycle of public fear and confusion,  (go to article)

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Is your in-car technology more than you can handle?

Cars.com via USA Today -- Today's technology-laden cars, SUVs and even trucks can be challenging for older drivers as well as car buyers who have been out of the market for several years. I'm among the many mature drivers who don't replace vehicles until they've been driven into the ground — my husband and I often go a decade or more between car purchases. Our current vehicles are of 2004 and 2006 vintage, and they lack much of the technology that's rapidly becoming common, often standard, on today's new cars.
---
Here are a few things other potentially overwhelmed car shoppers of any vintage should prepare to encounter:

*Backup cameras
*Blind spot monitors/lane departure warning systems
*Heat up or chill out
*Multimedia screens
*Push-button start
*Keyless entry and keyless access
*Seat adjustments  (go to article)

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Pennsylvania Drivers Surprised To See Dead Body On The Road

INQUISITR --
According to reports, a coroner’s office employee realized that the rear door of the coroner’s van he was driving had malfunctioned, and the dead body he was transporting fell out on the road. Bucks County Courier Times said that the driver immediately acted to retrieve the corpse “in a matter of moments” with the help of a bystander.

County spokesman Chris Edwards said that the coroner’s van was headed towards the county coroner’s office in Warminister when the incident occurred.

The bystander who helped the driver was identified as Jerry Bradley, who is a resident of Bucks County. He said that he saw the gurney while he was waiting at a traffic light on the intersection. Bradley pulled over as other cars continued driving by. He was surprised to see that the gurney had a corpse.......  (go to article)

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The Triumphant Return of Private U.S. Passenger Rail

The Atlantic -- Beginning in 2016, All Aboard Florida will run 32 departures a day between Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach, with service extending to Orlando.* With a maximum speed of 125 miles per hour, the trains will complete the 240-mile journey in less than three hours.

It's a big project by any standard, but it looms even larger in historical context. No private intercity passenger rail line has operated in the United States in 30 years — and it has been longer still since a new service was introduced.

Why not privatize intercity rail connection?  (go to article)

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How to Make Mass Transit Financially Sustainable Once and for All

The Atlantic -- Transit is essential to those who use it on a daily basis. But so are many other goods and services that have much lighter public involvement, ranging from food production and distribution to electricity and natural gas. Aside from the inability of transit operators to make money under the regulatory regime of 60 years ago, is there anything about transit that warrants public ownership?

Why not privatize transit?  (go to article)

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Tesla Motors, Inc. Wants to Annihilate Range Anxiety

Motley Fool -- The biggest concern consumers seem to have about electric vehicles is charging; it's been dubbed "range anxiety." Electric-car maker Tesla Motors is attempting to tackle this concern and crush it once and for all. Nowhere is this clearer than by looking at the rapid expansion of Tesla's Supercharger network.

Not only is Tesla's network of Superchargers the fastest-growing charging network on the planet, but it is also now the largest fast-charging network on the planet, period.

Just how big is the network? It now enables owners of Tesla vehicles to travel the entire width of the U.S., and up and down the West and East coasts. By the end of next year Tesla says that there will be a charging station within 100 miles of 98% of the population, giving almost any Model S owner in the U.S. the  (go to article)

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Don't Expect the Federal Government to Add to the Oil Boom

The Motley Fool -- A new report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows that the production of fossil fuels from federal lands fell in 2013 (the latest reporting period). This is a continuation of a long-term decline evident since at least 2003 (the earliest reporting period).

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of the Interior
Note: The federal fiscal year runs October 1-September 30. NGPL denotes natural gas plant liquids.

All fossil fuels from federal lands down for the reporting period
The decline is evident for all fossil fuels production from federal lands except for a slight 1% increase in crude oil production from 2012-2013 (following an overall decline of 11% since 2003). Total fossil fuels production from federal lands has declined 21% since 2003 with nea  (go to article)

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Lab produces car using 3-D printing

USA Today -- KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — What if you didn't need a billion-dollar factory and an assembly line to make a car? What if a customer could pick the design they wanted and have it made to order in a machine that looks like something out of "Star Trek?"

That's exactly what's happening at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where the 3-D printing lab is building a car in a radical new way that could change how the auto industry works.

"It's potentially a huge deal," said Jay Baron, president of the Center for Automotive Research. "They're going after manufacturing flexibility, low vehicle weight and reducing tooling costs. It would be a disruptive technology that could be the launching pad for other technologies and more consumer choice."  (go to article)

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Nissan tweaks CVTs to be less CVT-like

Automotive News -- NASHVILLE -- A software change that makes a continuously variable transmission sound and feel less like a CVT will go into every CVT-equipped Nissan model.

Nissan will introduce its advanced D-Step Shift logic this year in the CVTs of the 2015 Versa, Versa Note, Sentra, Altima V-6, Pathfinder and Quest. The feature was already offered on the 2013 four-cylinder Altima and the redesigned 2014 Rogue and will be added to other models in 2016.

D-Step creates the sensation that a CVT is shifting gears like a traditional automatic transmission though it is not.

Nissan leads the industry in CVT use and is responding to critics of the technology, says John Curl, Nissan North America regional product manager for small sedans, sports and electric vehicles. The company also wants to ease owners' ..  (go to article)

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Why Crossovers Conquered the American Highway

The Atlantic -- Something extraordinary is happening in the American automobile market. A new style of vehicle is taking over the supermarket parking lots, rural highways, and city streets. It's part SUV, part car, part minivan: a mutt of a vehicle.

People call them crossovers, and they've grown from an interesting experiment by Toyota, Honda, and Subaru in the mid-1990s into the biggest thing in the car business since the sedan, which most people know simply as "the car."

What does that change look like? Recently, I pulled into a hotel parking lot in Colorado. There were 24 parking spaces—and slotted into each and every one was a crossover. [...]

These days, three times as many crossovers are sold as SUVs and minivans combined.  (go to article)

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Billionaire Elon Musk Giving $1M To Tesla Museum

AP -- The billionaire owner of Tesla Motors is giving $1 million to a New York museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of the inventor who inspired its name.

The Tesla Science Center announced Elon Musk's donation on what would have been Nikola Tesla's 158th birthday.

The museum said Thursday that Musk will also install a Tesla supercharging station.

The museum is being built on the 16-acre site of Tesla's Wardenclyffe laboratory in Shoreham Long Island. The Serbian scientist began an unfinished project there to send messages and electricity around the world wirelessly.

Tesla is known for his work with alternating current and experiments with X-rays.

Musk co-founded PayPal and also runs space contractor SpaceX. His donation comes after a request from Tesla fan and museum backer Matthew...  (go to article)

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How to Clean the Gas and Oil Industries’ Most Contaminated Water

MIT Technology Review-A new process can cheaply clean extremely briny water coming up from oil wells -- In a nondescript site in Midland, Texas an inexpensive new process is cleaning up some of the most contaminated water around—the extremely salty stuff that comes up with oil at wells. By the end of next month the technology is expected to be chugging 500,000 gallons per day, furnishing water that’s sufficiently clean to use in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, for oil and natural gas production (see “Natural Gas Changes the Energy Map”).

The technology may provide a way to deal with the increasing amounts of contaminated water the fossil fuel industry is generating as it pursues more and more difficult-to-reach deposits. Many oil formations can produce as much as five barrels of contaminated water for every one barrel of oil. And the volume of this so-called “produced” water is rising...  (go to article)

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EU's United Front on Russia Falling Amid Gas Needs

ABC News -- A clutch of countries is breaking ranks with the EU's efforts to put economic and diplomatic pressure on Russia over Ukraine and building a pipeline meant to carry huge amounts of Russian gas to their doorstep.

Their defiance of a European Union stop work order is more significant than just another missed chance for Europe to call out the Kremlin. Russian natural gas already accounts for around a third of the EU's needs. The South Stream pipeline could increase Russian supplies to Europe by another 25 percent, potentially boosting Moscow's leverage long after the Ukraine crisis fades.

Adding to the skein of Russian pipelines already ending in Europe, South Stream would go through Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Slovenia, Austria and Italy in one leg and Croatia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey i  (go to article)

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The World Still Needs Saudi Arabia’s Oil

Motley Fool -- Economic analysts are torn as to how important Saudi Arabia will prove to the global economy in years ahead. In the first half of 2014, the US surpassed Saudi Arabia to become the world's foremost oil producer. This sparked widespread predictions that the US would soon become an oil exporter, reducing its dependency on Riyadh and harming Saudi Arabia's leading role in the Middle-East. However, the ISIS invasion of Iraq and Syria, the Boko Haram insurgency and continued oil theft in Nigeria, unrest in Venezuela and ongoing violence in Sudan and South Sudan have changed the deal.  (go to article)

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How the 2015 Ford Edge Will Take On Audi and BMW

Motley Fool -- Will Ford's all-new Edge be nice enough to steal sales from the German luxury-car brands?

Americans might be inclined to downplay that possibility. On the surface, the all-new 2015 Edge isn't all that different from Ford's current midsize crossover SUV. It's a little sleeker, a little sportier in some versions, but for the most part it looks a lot like the current Ford Edge.

But the new Edge built on the sophisticated architecture developed for the current Ford Fusion, so the new Edge should ride and handle like a more upscale vehicle. And inside, the all-new Edge follows Ford's recent approach of including -- at a price -- features and options normally associated with much more expensive luxury cars and SUVs.
 (go to article)

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Crumbling Roads in Oil Fields Slow U.S. Energy Boom

bloomberg.com -- The road to U.S. energy security is often unpaved.

In southern Texas and North Dakota, where shale drilling has propelled U.S. oil production to the highest level in 28 years, thousands of 18-wheel trucks are rumbling to wells on roads designed decades ago for farmers to bring crops to markets. Road closures have slowed output, with diverted traffic increasing accidents, as Texas seeks $1 billion to maintain roads in the oil belt.

With the U.S. projected to be energy self-sufficient by 2030, according to BP Plc (BP/), crumbling highways may threaten billions of dollars of investment in the oil patch. Because more wells are being drilled using hydraulic fracturing, there’s greater need for truckloads of water, sand and chemicals, as well as steel structures used in the process in fields o  (go to article)

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Time’s running out to take action

IOM Today -- As we continue in our wasteful consumption of energy, under the illusion that it’ll keep on being in cheap and plentiful supply despite rising demand, recently published International Energy Agency (IEA) figures seem to indicate that this illusion could be painfully exposed in coming decades.  (go to article)

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The Furtive-eGT makes its debut

Autonet -- French-designed vehicles are renowned for being unique, taking risks where other automakers may not dare to go. But this is the essence of haute couture, being bold rather than timid and making a statement that dares others to follow.

Making its debut at The Hurlingham Club on July 16 is a new electric sports car by French automaker Exagon Motors. The Furtive-eGT is built around a carbon fiber/honeycomb tub and cast aluminum rear substructure. The body weighs a slight 124 kg, with exceptional stiffness to aid in overall performance. At its core, this sports car is crafted to be a driver’s car and not simply an exercise in fashion design. Seating is for up to four people.  (go to article)

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This car runs on air

Autonet -- UK automaker Peugeot claims its new Hybrid Air system will run on air - and not in some faraway land and time. Apparently, its 2008 Hybrid Air CUV will be available to purchase in the UK in 2016, and will retail for around £16,000 (approx $30,000 CDN)

Before getting too excited though, it should be noted that there is still a conventional internal combustion engine inside, a three-cylinder 1.2L powerplant that runs on gasoline, which produces about 112 horsepower. The vehicle reportedly gets 94 MPG.  (go to article)

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Batteries battle fuel cells, leaving plug-in hybrids to prosper

Detroit News -- Auto manufacturers like Toyota of Japan are backing away from battery-only powered vehicles as sales fail to take-off, and hint that fuel-cells are the holy grail for future, green machines.

Investment banker Morgan Stanley detects an exasperation among manufacturers with electric cars apart from high-flying Tesla, and sees a flirtation with fuel cells, as mass market car buyers demand prices halve and range doubles before they will invest their hard-earned money in anything powered by a battery alone.

Meanwhile plug-in hybrids, which currently allow about 30 miles of battery-only driving, followed by a conventional amount of internal combustion power, are gaining ground as the preferred compromise while engineers seek to perfect the technology that will save the planet.

So, as governme  (go to article)

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FERC: Pipeline wouldn't harm environment

Kentucky.com -- A federal agency has determined that a proposal to build a natural gas pipeline across Todd County, Kentucky, that would serve Clarksville, Tennessee, would not adversely affect area landowners or the environment.

According to The Leaf-Chronicle, the finding was contained in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's environmental assessment of the Clarksville Natural Gas Interconnect Pipeline Project.

The report released earlier this month says with "appropriate mitigating measures" the project would not have a significant adverse effect.

Kentucky landowners have opposed the project saying it could harm the environment and they will reap no benefit from it.

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Richmond planners OK Chevron refinery upgrade

SF Gate -- Chevron Corp.’s long-delayed effort to upgrade its Richmond refinery won the blessings of the city’s planning commission late Thursday, moving the controversial project closer to construction.

The commission unanimously certified the upgrade’s latest environmental impact report, adopting several measures related to safety and pollution controls sought by the project’s opponents. The $1 billion modernization effort still needs approval from the Richmond City Council before construction can begin. Council hearings are scheduled for July 22 and July 29.

The project has split the Richmond community, and Thursday’s vote provoked mixed feelings on both sides. Opponents, who have long complained about the refinery’s pollution and safety record, thanked the commission for tacking on conditions d  (go to article)

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Coldest Antarctic June Ever Recorded

wattsupwiththat -- Antarctica continues to defy the global warming script, with a report from Meteo France, that June this year was the coldest Antarctic June ever recorded, at the French Antarctic Dumont d’Urville Station.

According to the press release, during June this year, the average temperature was -22.4c (-8.3F), 6.6c (11.9F) lower than normal. This is the coldest June ever recorded at the station, and almost the coldest monthly average ever – only September 1953 was colder, with a recorded average temperature of -23.5c (-10.3F).

June this year also broke the June daily minimum temperature record, with a new record low of -34.9c (-30.8F).

Other unusual features of the June temperature record are an unusual excess of sunlight hours (11.8 hours rather than the normal 7.4 hours), and unusually light  (go to article)

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Biggie's Food Mart drops prices to $1.99 to celebrate LeBron's homecoming

19 Action News Cleveland -- CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -
No you are not seeing things -- the sign says $1.99 a gallon, that's right $1.99!
From 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. today Biggie's Food Mart at 55th and Cedar is dropping prices to $1.99 a gallon.

The owner tells 19 Action News the promotion is his way of saying thank-you to the world's best basketball player and northeast Ohio native LeBron James.

James announced Friday that he was coming back home next season to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers, and the city has been celebrating ever since.

Go Cavs!!
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Our 21st Century Energy Wars

Counter Currents,org -- Global conflicts are increasingly fueled by the desire for oil and natural gas––and the funds they generate
Iraq, Syria, Nigeria, South Sudan, Ukraine, the East and South China Seas: wherever you look, the world is aflame with new or intensifying conflicts.
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Odenton man sentenced to 18 months in waste oil scheme

The Baltimore Sun -- An Odenton man was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison Friday after pleading guilty to laundering millions through a scheme involving waste vegetable oil.

U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz also sentenced Anthony Jean-Claude to three years of probation and ordered him to pay more than $1.5 million in restitution.

Steven H. Levin, Jean-Claude's attorney, said his client recognized the care Motz took in crafting the punishment. "[Jean-Claude] was very remorseful and regretted his conduct and appreciated the consideration that Judge Motz gave him in formulating a fair and just sentence," Levin said.
Jean-Claude, 40, pleaded guilty in February to money laundering. According to his plea agreement, the scheme involved waste vegetable oil, which can be recycled.

According to the plea a  (go to article)

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